Posts Under ‘Legal’ Category

The Real Estate Of London With The Eyes Of Large Finance Companies

CBRE’s International Corporation, one of the world’s largest companies in the field of real estate, predicts the reduction in the volume of transactions and the deceleration of price growth in the UK real estate as a result of the tightening of mortgage conditions and prospects of higher interest rates. But the steady growth of the economy and recent developments relating to stamp duty, must balance these trends. Stable domestic demand and a shortage of supply are regarded to as key factors underlying the rise in prices. The research team sees no reason to worry after May elections, hinting there are no serious prerequisites for drastic changes.

Taking this all into account, CBRE’s predicts a rise in prices for UK property by 25% over the next five years (starting with the growth of 6% per year approximately), and London will remain the leader in terms of pricing growth with approximately 31% growth. Outside the capital, according to CBRE’s, the strongest and most promising markets will be the Southeast, Southwest and East of England.

Property prices in London in 2020 will be at about 80% above their peak before the financial crisis, forecasts BNP Paribas – a European leader in global banking and financial services company. In London, according to calculations of BNP Paribas, prices will rise this year by 10% due to the favorable situation in the sphere of business and financial services. But in the period of 2016-2019 years the growth rate will slow down to somewhat 6.2% annually (7.6% per year in the whole of the UK over the next four years). The expenses associated with acquiring real estate will grow with an increase in legal services – conveyancing solicitors services are going to surge by 10% during the next 5 years.

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The risks of drink driving charges is there… even if you don’t actually drive

Each year more than 100,000 drivers are stopped by police stops with the level of alcohol exceeding 35 mgr in 100 ml of breath. The outcome of drink driving can be costly: a fine up to 5000 pounds can be issued, not to mention a disqualification of up to 3 years. In case of serious offences from 3 months to 14 years of imprisonment can be imposed.

This is the story about Martin Ostrowski, a law abiding citizen with no criminal records to his name and a long road made to obtain citizenship. On Friday night Martin went to the pub to drink beer with friends and left his car in the parking lot nearby. The last guest arriving at the party, he parked crookedly in a hurry, so the car was not parallel to the curb.

It was a perfect, long night with old good friends and five glasses of beer were liquored up almost unnoticed. Late at once the party was over he reached the car and realised that driving is not an option. Martin decided to take a nap, so he sat in the driver’s seat, lowered it and wrapped himself in a blanket.

He was awakened by a knock on the window and a flashlight – it was the police. They just wanted to know why the the car hadn’t been parked normally. Martin got out and started to talk – but it was all clear to the patrolmen. So he was asked to take a test for alcohol, which revealed 51 mg – enough to initiate legal proceedings.

A sad concatenation of circumstances has not only made the risk of a heavy fine and disqualification, but also put years of hard work as for acquiring citizenship in jeopardy. So the only way out was seeking for quality legal assistance… which worked. Martin has taken advantage to find a solicitor at Solicitors Guru website focusing on drink driving and speeding penalties – a platform provides an impressive selection of legal services. By the way in such cases you can prevent much spendings on the legal fees – how to do that read in the article covering the issue on cases with no win no fee basis.

So as the legal proceeding was inevitable Martin was instructed on how to respond to police questions and give comments (in this particular case things were largely narrowed to ‘no comments’). During the proceedings the conjunctive work of defence (Martin and his lawyer) has managed to keep the results at more than accessible level: the 6 points penalty and a 300 pounds fine were issued, but the driving license was not disqualified and the citizenship status was rescued, as the outcome didn’t have any impact on it. The worst case scenario was avoided, and the price paid for the full legal services assistance was estimated at 850 pounds.

Martin says he could have cut off his expenses through self-representation in the court – in this case the price could have been 500 pounds, but the absence of legal background was the lion in the path. ‘It was a high price to pay for the night in the car… I could have chosen a luxurious 5 star hotel, but at least the outcome is ok. I’ve learned the lesson once and for all’.